Published Research

Berri, David J. and Martin B. Schmidt. 2010 Stumbling on Wins: Two Economists Explore the Pitfalls on the Road to Victory in Professional Sports. Financial Times Press (Princeton, N.J.)

Prominent Discussions of Stumbling on Wins:
Abbott, Henry. (2010). “The Robots are Coming, and They’re Cranky” ESPN.com. (March 17) http://espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/post/_/id/14349/the-robots-are-coming-and-theyre-cranky

Van Riper, Tom (2010). “Is LeBron Really the Best?” Forbes.com. (May 5)
http://www.forbes.com/2010/05/05/sports-economics-lebron-james-business-sports-beliefs.html

Feschuk, Dave. “Changing NBA Coaches Mostly Pointless, Report Claim.” Toronto Star (May 18)

Berri, David J., Martin B. Schmidt, and Stacey L. Brook. 2006. The Wages of Wins: Taking Measure of the Many Myths in Modern Sport. Stanford University Press. Released in paperback in September, 2007.

Named by the Industrial Relations Section at Princeton University as a Noteworthy Book in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics for 2006

Prominent Discussions of The Wages of Wins:
Gladwell, Malcolm. 2006. “Game Theory: When it comes to athletic prowess, don't believe your eyes.”
The New Yorker (May 29): 86-87.

Nocera, Joe. 2006. “Sportonomics Beguiles 3 Economists” The New York Times. (June 24).

Friedman, Dick. 2006. “Book Review: The Wages of Wins - Adam Smith, meet Joe Smith.”
SportsIllustrated.com.

Published Research in Academic Journals

Berri, David J., Jennifer Van Gilder, and Aju Fenn. (2014) “Is the Sports Media Color-blind?” International Journal of Sport Finance. 9, n2: 130-148.

Berri, David J. and Martin Schmidt. (2013). “On the Evaluation of Kickers in the National Football League.” International Journal of Sport Finance, 4: 263-278

Berri, David J. (2012) “Did the Players Give Up Money to Make the NBA Better? Exploring the 2011 Collective Bargaining Agreement in the National Basketball Association.”  International Journal of Sport Finance, 7: 158-175.

Berri, David J., Rob Simmons, Jennifer Van Gilder, and Lisle O’Neill. (2011) “What does it mean to find the Face of the Franchise? Physical Attractiveness and the Evaluation of Athletic Performance.” Economics Letters.111: 200-202.

Simmons, Rob and David J. Berri (2011). “Mixing the Princes and the Paupers: Pay and Performance in the National Basketball Association.”
Labour Economics. 18, n3; (June). 381-388.

Robst, John, Jennifer VanGilder, Corrine Coates, and David J. Berri. (2011). “Skin Tone and Wages: Evidence from NBA Free Agents”
Journal of Sports Economics. 12, n2; (April). 143-156.

Robst, John, Jennifer Van Gilder, David J. Berri, and Coby Vance. (2011) “Defense Win Championships? The Answer from the Gridiron.”
International Journal of Sport Finance, 5: 296-313

Berri, David J., Stacey L. Brook, and Aju Fenn (2011). “From College to the Pros: Predicting the NBA Amateur Player Draft.”
Journal of Productivity Analysis, 35, n1: 25-35, February.

Berri, David J. and Rob Simmons. (2011) “Catching a Draft: On the Process of Selecting Quarterbacks in the National Football League Amateur Draft.”
Journal of Productivity Analysis, 35, n1: 37-49, February.

Price, Joseph, Brian Soebbing, David Berri, Brad Humphreys (2010). “Tournament Incentives, League Policy, and NBA Team Performance Revisited.”
Journal of Sports Economics. 11, n2; (April). 117-135.

Berri, David J. and Stacey Brook (2010). “On the Evaluation of the “Most Important” Position in Professional Sports.”
Journal of Sports Economics. 11, n2; (April): 157-171.

Berri, David J. and J.C. Bradbury (2010). “Working in the Land of Metricians.”
Journal of Sports Economics, 11, n1; (February).

Berri, David J. and Rob Simmons. (2009) “Catching a Draft: On the Process of Selecting Quarterbacks in the National Football League Amateur Draft.”
Journal of Productivity Analysis. On-line citation: DOI 10.1007/s11123-009-0154-6 (available in print in 2011).

Krautmann, Anthony, Peter Von Allmen, and David J. Berri. (2009) “The Underpayment of Restricted Players in North American Sports Leagues.”
International Journal of Sport Finance, 4, n3; (August): 155-169.

Berri, David J., Michael Leeds, Eva Marikova Leeds, and Michael Mondello (2009).”The Role of Managers in Team Performance.”
International Journal of Sport Finance, 4, n2; (May): 75-93.

Simmons, Rob and David J. Berri. (2009) “Does it Always Pay to Specialize? The Story from the Gridiron.”
Review of Industrial Organization, 34, n1; (February): 81-98.

Berri, David J. and Rob Simmons. (2009). “Race and the Evaluation of Signal Callers in the National Football League.”
Journal of Sports Economics, 10, n1; (February): 23-43

Fort, Rodney, Young Hoon, Lee, and David J. Berri. (2008) “Race and Coaching Efficiency in the NBA.”
International Journal of Sport Finance, 3, n2; (May): 84-96

Lee, Young Hoon and David J. Berri. (2008) “A Re-Examination of Production Functions and Efficiency Estimates for the National Basketball Association.”
Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 55, n1; (February): 51-66.

Berri, David J., Stacey L. Brook, and Martin B. Schmidt. (2007) “Does One Simply Need to Score to Score?”
International Journal of Sport Finance, 2, n4; (November): 190-205.

Krautmann, Anthony and David J. Berri. (2007). “Can We Find It at the Concessions? Understanding Price Elasticity in Professional Sports.”
Journal of Sports Economics, 8, n2; (April):183-91.

Berri, David J., and Martin B. Schmidt. (2006). “On the Road with the National Basketball Association’s Superstar Externality.”
Journal of Sports Economics, 7, n4; (November): 347-358.

Berri, David J., and Anthony Krautmann. (2006). "Shirking on the Court: Testing for the Dis-Incentive Effects of Guaranteed Pay."
Economic Inquiry. 44, n3; (July): 536-546

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri.(2006) “What Takes Them Out to the Ball Game?”
Journal of Sports Economics, 7, n2; (May): 222-233.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2005) “Concentration of Playing Talent: Evolution in Major League Baseball.”
Journal of Sports Economics, 6, n4; (November): 412-419.

Berri, David J., Stacey L. Brook, Aju Fenn, Bernd Frick, and Roberto Vicente-Mayoral. (2005). “The Short Supply of Tall People: Explaining Competitive Imbalance in the National Basketball Association.”
Journal of Economics Issues, v39, n4; (December): 1029-1041.

Berri, David J. and Erick Eschker. (2005). “Performance When It Counts? The Myth of the Prime-Time Performer in the NBA.
Journal of Economics Issues, v39, n3; (September): 798-807.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2004). “Another Look at Competition: A Regime Switching Approach.
Applied Economics, 36: 2453-2460.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2004). “Convergence and Clustering in Major League Baseball: The Haves and Haves Not?”
Applied Economics, 36: 2007-2014.

Berri, David J. and Todd Jewell. (2004). “Wage Inequality and Firm Performance: Examining a Natural Experiment from Professional Basketball.”
Atlantic Economic Journal, 32, n2; June: 130-139.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2004). “The Impact of Labor Strikes on Consumer Demand: An Application to Professional Sports.”
American Economic Review, 94, n.1: March: 344-357.

Berri, David J., Martin B. Schmidt, and Stacey L. Brook. (2004). “Stars At The Gate: The Impact of Star Power on NBA Gate Revenues”
Journal of Sports Economics, 5, n1; February: 33-50.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2003). “On the Evolution of Competitive Balance: The Impact of an Increasing Global Search.”
Economic Inquiry, 41, n4; October: 692-704.

Cutler, Harvey, David J. Berri and Terutomo Ozawa. (2003). “Market Recycling in Labor-Intensive Goods, Flying-Geese Style: An Empirical Analysis of East Asian Exports to the U.S.”
Journal of Asian Economics 14, n1; February: 35-50.

Berri, David J. and Martin B. Schmidt. (2002). “Instrumental vs. Bounded Rationality: The Case of Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association.”
Journal of Socio-Economics. (formerly the Journal of Behavioral Economics), 31, n3; 191-214.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2002). “Competitive Balance and Market Size in Major League Baseball: A Response to Baseball’s Blue Ribbon Panel.”
Review of Industrial Organization, 21, n1; August: 41-54.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2002). “The Impact of the 1981 and 1994-95 Strikes on Major League Baseball Attendance: A Time-Series Analysis.”
Applied Economics, 34, n4; March: 471-478.

Schmidt, Martin B. and David J. Berri. (2001). “Competitive Balance and Attendance: The Case of Major League Baseball.”
Journal of Sports Economics, 2, n2; May: 145-167.

Berri, David J. and Christopher R. Adams. (2000). “The Social and Economic Impact of Weather Information: A Case Study of the Surface Transportation Industries”;
Regional Business Review, 19; May: 13-31.

Berri, David J. (1999). “Who is Most Valuable? Measuring the Player’s Production of Wins in the National Basketball Association.”
Managerial and Decision Economics, 20, n8; Fall: 411-427.

Berri, David J. and Terutomo Ozawa. (1997). "Pax Americana and Asian Exports: Revealed Trends of Comparative Advantage Recycling."
The International Trade Journal 11, n1; Spring: 39-67.

Additional manuscripts published

Berri, David J. and Anthony Krautmann. (2013). “Understanding the WNBA On and Off the Court.” In Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports. edited by Eva Marikova Leeds and Michael Leeds. Edward Elgar Press. pp. 132-155.

Berri, David. J, Brad R. Humphreys, and Rob Simmons. (2013). “Valuing the Blind Side: Pay and Performance of Offensive Lineman in the NFL.” in The Econometrics of Sport, eds. P. Rodriguez and J. Garcia; Edward Elgar Press. 99-116.

Berri, David J. (2012)“A Free Market Solution (from Europe) to the Labor Problems in North American Sports.” Originally published at Freakonomics, December 20, 2011   (www.freakonomics.com). Republished: “Adopting European System Would Eliminate Labor Issues in US Sports”. In Are Players' Unions Good for Professional Sports Leagues? edited by Thomas Riggs.Gale Cengage Publishing. pp. 85-90.

Berri, David J. (2012). “Measuring Performance in the National Basketball Association.” in The Handbook of Sports Economics, eds. Stephen Shmanske and Leo Kahane; Oxford University Press. 94-117.

Berri, David and Brian Burke. (2012). “Measuring Performance in the NFL.” in The Economics of the National Football League: The State of the Art, ed. Kevin Quinn; Springer Publisher: 137-158.

Berri, David J and Ryan Rodenberg. (2011). “Crime and Punishment in the NBA” in Violence and Aggression in Sporting Contests: Economics, History and Policy, ed. R. Todd Jewell; Springer Publishers: 65-78

Berri, David J. (2008) “A Simple Measure of Worker Productivity in the National Basketball Association.” in The Business of Sport; eds. Brad Humphreys and Dennis Howard, 3 volumes, Westport, Conn.: Praeger: 1-40.

Berri, David J. (2007). “Back to Back Evaluation on the Gridiron.” in Statistical Thinking in Sport; eds. James H. Albert and Ruud H. Koning, Chapman & Hall/CRC: 235-256.

Berri, David. J. (2006). “Labor Economics on the Hardwood: the NBA.” in Handbook on the Economics of Sport; eds. Wladimir Andreff and Stefan Szymanski; Edward Elgar
Publishing Limited: 523-529.

Berri, David J. (2006) “Economics and the National Basketball Association: Surveying the Literature at the Tip-off.” in The Handbook of Sports Economics Research; edited by John Fizel; M.E. Sharpe, Inc.: 21-48

Berri, David J. (2004) “Is There a Short Supply of Tall People in the College Game?” in Economics of Collegiate Sports; eds. John Fizel and Rodney Fort; Praeger Publishers: 211-223.

Berri, David J. and Stacey L. Brook. (1999). “Trading Players in the National Basketball Association: For Better or Worse?" in Sports Economics: Current Research; ed. John Fizel, Elizabeth Gustafson, and Larry Hadley; Praeger Publishers: 135-151.

Writing for Popular Press

Berri, David J. "Why Top NBA Draft Picks So Often Disappoint: Managers seem to think that youth, points scored, and Final Four experience predict college players' pro performance. History tells a different story."  theAtlantic.com (June 25, 2014). www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/06/why-do-top-nba-draft-picks-always-disappoint/373338/

Berri, David J. "NFL Scouts Have No Clue How to Predict the Next Great Quarterback: Research indicates that the factors that make college football players early-round draft picks are useless at predicting success in the NFL."  theAtlantic.com (May 8, 2014). www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/05/nfl-scouts-have-no-clue-how-to-predict-the-     next-great-quarterback/361936/

Berri, David J. “Carmelo Anthony: Way Overrated. The star NBA forward isn't as valuable to the Knicks as their fans—or their front office—think."theAtlantic.com (May 2, 2014). http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/05/carmelo-anthony-way-overrated/361528/

Berri, David J. “If We Paid NCAA Basketball Players What They’re Really Worth, This Is What They’d Earn: And Here’s a Cockamamie Plan to Get it for Them.” theAtlantic.com (March 21, 2014). http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/03/if-we-paid-ncaa-basketball-players-what-theyre-really-worth-this-is-what-theyd-earn/284559/

Berri, David J. “The Brooklyn Nets: How to Build a Disappointing NBA Team, Exhibit A.”theAtlantic.com(January 3, 2014) www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/01/the-brooklyn-nets-how-to-build-a-disappointing-nba-team-exhibit-a/282789/

Berri, David J. “Economists vs. Tanking: David Berri.” ESPN.com. (September 4, 2013). espn.go.com/blog/truehoop/post/_/id/62281/economists-vs-tanking-david-berri

Berri, David. J. “One More Reason to Pay College Athletes: If players were paid, market forces would work against competitive imbalance.” Time.com (August 17, 2013).             ideas.time.com/2013/08/17/one-more-reason-to-pay-college-athletes/#ixzz2cfD2AJjC

Berri, David J. “Do Pretty-Boy Quarterbacks Make More Money?” The New York Times: Play Magazine (September 14, 2008).

Berri, David J. “Big Things Poppin’: Why the Kevin Garnett Trade Virtually Guarantees the Celtics 50 Wins This Season.” VIBE Magazine (November, 2007):106.

Berri, David J. “The Short Supply of Competitive Balance.” Keeping Score Column for The New York Times (May 6, 2007).

Berri, David J. “The Wages of Wins: The Price of a Jump Shot in the NBA.” Yale Economic Review. (Winter, 2007).

Berri, David J. “Star Power Can Leave Home Fans with Empty Feeling.” Keeping Score Column for The New York Times (February 18, 2007).

Berri, David J. “To Get a Grip on Turnovers, Follow the Bouncing Ball.” Keeping Score Column for The New York Times (September 10, 2006).

Berri, David J. “The N.B.A. Secret Superstars” invited op-ed for The New York Times (June 10, 2006).

Originally written April 11, 2006 (updated July, 2014)

As I compiled this list a thought came to me. Much of this research employs the productivity data generated in sports to tell stories about people who bring us the games we love. I thought it might be interesting to look at the story my productivity data tells. Okay, this is probably only interesting to me and if you found this essay tucked away here at the bottom of this page.... well, you probably need to get back to work or find something more entertaining to occupy your time.

Of course, now that your here, let’s walk through the data. If we count the forthcoming work, I currently have 40 papers published in refereed journals. I received my Ph.D. in the summer of 1997, so I have published about 2.2 papers per year over the course of my career. Is that good or bad? In the past I worked on research with Abbas Grammy at Cal-State Bakersfield (where I used to work) examining the quantity of research produced by economists in the California State University system. Our research indicated that on average an economist employed at the many campuses in the California State University system publishes one paper every three years in refereed journals. Every three years I publish six to seven papers, so relative to my peers in the Cal-State system, I am a bit more productive. Steve Levitt, co-author of Freakonomics, publishes five papers every year, or fifteen papers every three years. So relative to him... well, I get to make excuses for why I am not so productive. As we state in The Wages of Wins, good or bad depends upon your point of reference. So if I ignore the amazing productivity of Steve Levitt and economists like him, I can sort of feel good about myself.

Beyond my publication rate, we can also see that virtually all of my work is co-authored. Over the course of my career I have published research with more than 20 different writers, with Martin Schmidt being my most frequent collaborator. In all, Marty and I have published more than a dozen papers together. One can look at this as I work well with others, or lack the skills to complete projects by myself. I like the “works well with others” story, although my many co-authors might play up the “lacking skills” angle.

One final issue is who publishes the academic work I write. We economists love to rank journals – actually we love to rank everything, but that is another story -- and most rankings would rate my one publication in The American Economic Review and my two papers in Economic Inquiry as my best. Of my remaining 37 papers in refereed journals, many have appeared have appeared in the Journal of Sports Economics and the International Journal of Sport Finance (the two top journals in sports economics -- and yes, there are only two!). My remaining publications have appeared in a variety of different journals. Not sure what story that stat tells. There are more than 400 journals in economics (or maybe 600 -- there are a bunch!), so apparently I have some writing to do if I am going to land in all of these.