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Annotated Publication List

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (in press). Fathering diversity within societies. In L.A. Jensen (Ed.), Oxford handbook of human development and culture: An interdisciplinary perspective. New York: Oxford University Press. This chapter analyzes sources of diversity among fathers in Central/East Africa, the Caribbean, China, and India.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (2014). Fatherhood in Brazil, Bangladesh, Russia, Japan, and Australia. Online Readings in Psychology and Culture 6(3). http://dx.doi.org/10.9707/2307-0919.1125 This article in the international collection of readings on psychology and culture (sponsored by the IACCP) summarizes research on diversity within five major cultural groups.

Takahashi, M., Shwalb, D.W., & Shwalb, B.J. (2013). Manual of basic expressions for writing English-language psychology manuscripts. Tokyo: Asakura Shoten [Shinrigaku no tame no eigoronbun no kihon hyogen]. This volume is designed to enable Japanese psychologists and students to write effective articles in English, and explains several hundred sentence patterns and common expressions used in all areas of psychology. (in Japanese)

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Lamb, M. E. (Eds.) (2013). Fathers in cultural context. New York: Routledge. This edited volume presents the latest research in 14 main chapters representing cultures comprising more than half the world's population and on all continents. It is the most comprehensive and up-to-date compilation of international research on fathers to date.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Takahashi, M. (2013). How to write and publish psychology articles in English - Updated Edition [Hajimete no shinrigaku eigo ronbun: Kochoshinpan]. Kyoto: Kitaoji Shobo. This manual for Japanese scholars and psychology students explained how to publish papers and communicate with psychologists in English. (in Japanese)

Nakazawa, J., & Shwalb, D. W. (2013). Fathering in Japan: Entering an era of involvement with children. In D.W. Shwalb, B.J. Shwalb, & M.E. Lamb (Eds.), Fathers in cultural context (pp. 42 – 66). New York: Routledge. This chapter presents the state of the art for fathering research in Japanese culture. It concludes that there is now a generational shift toward active fathering in Japan.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Nakazawa, J. (2011). How to write and publish English-language psychology articles and abstracts. In S. Iwatate & Y. Nishino (Eds.), New Handbook of Japanese developmental psychology (Volume 2): Methods and measurement in developmental psychology (pp. 254-274). Tokyo: Shinyosha Publishers. This handbook chapter acquaints Japanese scholars and students with how to more effectively publish developmental psychology papers in English. (in Japanese)

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Hyun, J.-H., Chen, S.-J., Kusanagi, E., Satiadarma, M. P., MacKay, R., & Wilkey, B. (2010). Maternal beliefs, images, and metaphors of child development in the United States, Korea, Indonesia, and Japan. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report (Hokkaido University, 30, 1-22. This four-culture study found cultural similarities and differences in mothers' thinking about childhood, child development, and parenting between four cultures.

Shwalb, D. W., Nakazawa, J., Yamamoto, T., & Hyun, J. H. (2010). Fathering in Japan, China, and Korea: Changing contexts, images, and roles. In M. E. Lamb (Ed.), The role of the father in child development (5th edition) (pp. 341-387). New York: Wiley. This chapter was a complete update of our previous review chapter on fathering in East Asia. It suggested that previous studies and reviews may have to be reconsidered in terms of their over-reliance on traditional conceptions of fathers in each of the three cultures.

Blaze, J. T., & Shwalb, D. W. (2009). Resource loss and relocation: A follow-up study of adolescents two years after Hurricane Katrina. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 1, 312-322. This study of high school students in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, especially those who had been displaced from the Gulf Coast in 2005, showed that three years following Hurricane Katrina students still reported significant levels of anxiety and PTSD, along with other psychological difficulties and strong resilience.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (2009). Hurricane Katrina and local college students: A first-hand report. In K. Huffman, Psychology in action (9th edition) (pp. 96-98). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. This feature box in a best-selling introductory psychology textbook recounts the results of a three-wave survey conducted on regular and displaced students in Louisiana following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Nakazawa, J., Hyun, J.-H., , Le, H.V., & Satiadarma, M. P. (2009). Child development in East and Southeast Asia: Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Indonesia. In M. H. Bornstein (Ed.), Handbook of cross-cultural developmental science (pp. 445-464). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter reviews the literature on family and peer group influences on child/adolescent development, as well as culture-specific contemporary issues relevant to development, in four major Asian cultures.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (2009). Childhood and adolescence in Asian societies and cultures. In R. Shweder (Ed.), Chicago companion to the child (pp. 70-72). University of Chicago Press. This paper describes the historical context and contemporary trends of childhood in China, India, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J., (2009). Bunka to kodo [Culture and behavior]. In T. Nishimoto, Y. Oyabu, K. Fukuzawa, & Y. Koshikawa (Eds.), Gendai shinrigaku nyumon: Shinka to bunka no kurosurodo [Contemporary psychology: Crossroads of evolution and culture] (pp. 468-484). Tokyo: Kawashima Shoten. This chapter, in Japanese, provides examples of cross-cultural research findings in most of the major areas of psychology. (in Japanese)

Batson, M., & Shwalb, D. W. (2006). Forgiveness and religious faith in Roman Catholic married couples. Pastoral Psychology. This paper showed a statistical connection between faith and forgiveness, and reported a factor analysis of a measure of forgiveness.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (2006). Concept development of respect and disrespect in American kindergarten and first- and second-grade children. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 114, 67-80. This report compares kindergarten with 1st/2nd grade children, reporting the results of a quasi-experimental study of children’s conceptual understanding.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Kusanagi, E., Chen, S.-J., Wilkey, B., & MacKay, R. (2006). Contexts of childrearing in Japan and the United States: Daily life settings, relationships, and activities. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report (Hokkaido University), 28, 115-124. This report describes a large-scale survey of Japanese and American mothers and fathers, comparing the factor structure of their beliefs about childrearing.

Sugie, S., Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (2006). Respect in Japanese childhood, adolescence, and society. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 114, 39-52. This article showed how the concept of respect is reflected by Japanese children and adolescents, as grounded in Japanese history and culture.

Shwalb, D. W., Takahashi, M., Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. A. (2005). Shinrigakusha no tame no net skill guidebook: Eigo ni yoru Internet communication nyumon [Introduction to Internet communication: A guidebook for psychologists]. Kyoto: Kitaoji Shobo. (in Japanese) This guidebook (in Japanese) introduced readers to the use of the Internet (World Wide Web, e-mail, etc.) for students and scholars of psychology.

Shwalb, D. W., Nakazawa, J., & Shwalb, B. J. (Eds.) (2005). Applied developmental psychology: Theory, practice, and research from Japan. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. This book included sixteen chapters of research reports and literature review by native Japanese developmental psychologists emphasizing applied and cultural issues.

Shwalb, D. W., Sugie, S., & Yang, C. M. (2005). Motivation for abacus studies and school mathematics: A longitudinal study of Japanese 3rd - 6th graders. In D. Shwalb, J. Nakazawa, & B. Shwalb (Eds.), Applied developmental psychology: Theory, practice, and research from Japan (pp. 109-135). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. This chapter used Structural Equation Modeling to test the relations between motivation and self-perceptions of abacus juku studies and formal school math.

Shwalb, D. W., Nakazawa, J., Yamamoto, T., & Hyun, J.-H. (in press). Fathering in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean cultures: A review of the research literature. In M. Lamb (Ed.), The role of the father in child development (4th edition). New York: Wiley. This chapter reviewed research previously only available in the Japanese, Chinese, and Korean languages, which had been unknown to audiences outside of Asia.

Shwalb, D., Bubb, R., Daveline, A., Humperys, C., Evans, K., Erickson, M., Hall, A., Hunter, T., Kilgore, P., Lemon, N., MacKay, R., Mathews, R., Ostenson, J., & Wilkey, B. A. (in press). Coming to America: Asian fathers cross cultures. Marriage and families. This paper reports interviews with immigrant and sojourner fathers from Japan, Korea, China, India, Vietnam and Thailand, on their transition to fathering in the U.S.

Shwalb, D. W., Chen, S. -J., MacKay, R., & Wilkey, B. (2003). "Are children among the gods?": Parental images of children and childrearing in Japan and the United States. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report. This report was about how parents in 2 cultures think about their children and the nature of childhood, and about intervening in children’s disputes with friends.)

Shwalb, D. W. (2000). The overwhelming importance of personal relationships for Japanese human development and motivation. Human Development, 40, 230-234. This invited commentary discussed research on adolescents’ relationships in terms of basic values and motivation among the Japanese.

Shwalb, D. W., & Sukemune, S. (1998). Help seeking in the Japanese college classroom: Developmental, cultural and social-psychological influences. In S. Karabenick (Ed.), Strategic help seeking: Implications for knowledge acquisition (pp. 141-170). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter discussed my experiences teaching in Japanese colleges, focusing on the issue of why college students are hesitant to ask questions in class.

Nakazawa, J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1997). Japanese developmental psychology in the 1990s. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 18, 447-452. This was an introductory article of a special edition of the journal we edited to introduce the work of several scholars who were unknown outside of Japan.

Shwalb, D. W., Kawai, H., Shoji, J., & Tsunetsugu, K. (1997). The middle class Japanese father: A survey of parents of preschoolers. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 18, 497-511. This paper was based on a large-scale survey by a consortium of psychologists, physicians, and clinicians, and sponsored by the Japanese government.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (Eds.) (1996). Japanese childrearing: Two generations of scholarship. New York: Guilford Press. This book included essays and personal retrospectives by eight pioneers in the field of Japanese family studies, and reaction papers by eight younger scholars.

Shwalb, D. W., & Chen, S. -J. (1996). Sacred or selfish? A survey on Japanese parents' images of children. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report (Hokkaido University), 18, 33-44. This paper looked at parents’ reaction to the old Japanese saying that "Until age 7 children are among the gods" and found it to be of limited modern relevance.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Shoji, J. (1996). Japanese mothers' ideas about infants and temperament. In S. Harkness & C. Super (Eds.), Parents' cultural belief systems (pp.169-191). New York: Guilford Press. This chapter discussed how mothers in Japan use different categories (dimensions) to understand the temperament of their babies, and how these categories are similar to those used to describe adult personality.

Shwalb, D. W., Kawai, H., Shoji, J., & Tsunetsugu, K. (1995). The place of advice: Japanese parents' sources of information about child health and development. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 16(4), 645-660. This survey showed that Japanese mothers and fathers both lack information about children, and that particularly fathers have very limited social networks.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1995). Cooperative learning and cultural context: An integrative review. International Journal of Educational Research, 23(3), 293-300. This chapter integrated several papers about the influence of history and cultural values on the success of cooperative learning methods in schools.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (Eds.) (1995). Cooperative learning and cultural context. Whole issue, International Journal of Educational Research, 23(3), 191-300. We edited this special issue of the IJER, a collection of invited papers about how cooperative learning is used in Asia, Africa, Europe, and North/South America.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Nakazawa, J. (1995). Competitive and cooperative attitudes: A longitudinal survey of Japanese adolescents. Journal of Early Adolescence, 15(1), 267-290. This three-year survey showed that cooperativeness and competitiveness depends not only on age, but also students’ entry year into school and the specific classrooms to which they belong.

Shwalb, B. J., Shwalb, D. W., & Shoji, J. (1994). Structure and dimensions of maternal perceptions of Japanese infant temperament. Developmental Psychology, 30(2), 131-141. This paper presented our new assessment scale to measure understanding of babies’ temperament, showing the influence of culture on mothers’ perceptions.

Shwalb, D. W. (1993). The internationalization of psychology. Newsletter of the Japanese Psychological Association, 4, 5. This invited essay discussed the importance of Japanese psychology for the internationalization of world psychology.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1992). Development of a course ratings form by college students and faculty. Teaching of Psychology, 19(4), 232-234. This paper tells how an undergraduate psychology class created a new teacher rating questionnaire, which has been used since by the entire college.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Harnisch, D., Maehr, M., & Akabane, K. (1992). Personal investment in Japan and the USA: A study of worker motivation. International Journal of Intercultural Communication, 16,107-124. This study replicated an American survey on worker motivation, and showed important differences in the thinking of American and Japanese workers.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Sukemune, S., & Tatsumoto, S. (1992). Japanese non- maternal childcare: Past, present and future. In M. Lamb, K. Sternberg, C. -P. Hwang, & A. Broberg (Eds.), Childcare in context (pp.331-353). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter described the history of Japanese alternatives to children being raised at home by mothers, including day care centers, kindergartens, grandparents, and residential institutions.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Murata, K. (1991). Individualistic striving and group dynamics of Japanese fifth and eighth grade boys. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 22(3), 347-361. This report described an experiment on Japanese children, which showed that 5th graders work best in groups while 8th graders prefer to compete and work alone.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Murata, K. (1989). Cooperation, competition, individualism and interpersonalism in fifth and eighth grade Japanese boys. International Journal of Psychology, 24, 617-630. This study combined a survey and an experiment and showed that while cooperation is valued both in 5th and 8th grade, competition becomes more desirable and complex with age.

Shwalb, D. W., Imaizumi, N., & Nakazawa, J. (1987). The modern Japanese father: Roles and problems in a changing society. In M. E. Lamb (Ed.), The father's role: Cross-cultural perspectives (pp. 247 - 269). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter discussed research published in Japan, and showed how the roles of Japanese fathers are poorly defined and rapidly changing.

Shwalb, B. J., Shwalb, D. W., & Azuma, H. (1986). Educational technology in the Japanese schools: A meta-analysis. Educational Technology Research, 9,13-30. This paper described the effectiveness of a limited number of interventions using educational technology in Japan, prior to the advent of desktop computers.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1985). The development of cooperation and competition in Japanese public schools: Two national surveys. Evaluation in Education, 9, 285-299. This research showed how cooperation and competition change between elementary school and high school, from the views of both teachers and pupils.

Kida, H., Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (Eds.) (1985). Socialization and school achievement in Japan: Implications for educators. Whole issue, Evaluation in Education, 9, 217-300. We edited this special journal issue to present the work of six important researchers who conducted research on Japanese schooling.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (1985). Japanese cooperative and competitive attitudes: Age and gender effects. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 8, 313-328. This paper showed that Japanese boys tend to have more competitive and less cooperative values, compared with girls, from childhood through adolescence.


Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Hyun, J.-H., Chen, S.-J., Kusanagi, E., Satiadarma, M. P., MacKay, R., & Wilkey, B. (2010). Maternal beliefs, images, and metaphors of child development in the United States, Korea, Indonesia, and Japan. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report (Hokkaido University, 30, 1-22. This four-culture study found cultural similarities and differences in mothers' thinking about childhood, child development, and parenting between four cultures.

Shwalb, D. W., Nakazawa, J., Yamamoto, T., & Hyun, J. H. (2010). Fathering in Japan, China, and Korea: Changing contexts, images, and roles. In M. E. Lamb (Ed.), The role of the father in child development (5th edition) (pp. 341-387). New York: Wiley. This chapter was a complete update of our previous review chapter on fathering in East Asia. It suggested that previous studies and reviews may have to be reconsidered in terms of their over-reliance on traditional conceptions of fathers in each of the three cultures.

Blaze, J. T., & Shwalb, D. W. (2009). Resource loss and relocation: A follow-up study of adolescents two years after Hurricane Katrina. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 1, 312-322. This study of high school students in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, especially those who had been displaced from the Gulf Coast in 2005, showed that three years following Hurricane Katrina students still reported significant levels of anxiety and PTSD, along with other psychological difficulties and strong resilience.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (2009). Hurricane Katrina and local college students: A first-hand report. In K. Huffman, Psychology in action (9th edition) (pp. 96-98). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. This feature box in a best-selling introductory psychology textbook recounts the results of a three-wave survey conducted on regular and displaced students in Louisiana following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Nakazawa, J., Hyun, J.-H., , Le, H.V., & Satiadarma, M. P. (2009). Child development in East and Southeast Asia: Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Indonesia. In M. H. Bornstein (Ed.), Handbook of cross-cultural developmental science (pp. 445-464). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter reviews the literature on family and peer group influences on child/adolescent development, as well as culture-specific contemporary issues relevant to development, in four major Asian cultures.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (2009). Childhood and adolescence in Asian societies and cultures. In R. Shweder (Ed.), Chicago companion to the child (pp. 70-72). University of Chicago Press. This paper describes the historical context and contemporary trends of childhood in China, India, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J., (2009). Bunka to kodo [Culture and behavior]. In T. Nishimoto, Y. Oyabu, K. Fukuzawa, & Y. Koshikawa (Eds.), Gendai shinrigaku nyumon: Shinka to bunka no kurosurodo [Contemporary psychology: Crossroads of evolution and culture] (pp. 468-484). Tokyo: Kawashima Shoten. (in Japanese). This chapter, in Japanese, provides examples of cross-cultural research findings in most of the major areas of psychology.

Batson, M., & Shwalb, D. W. (2006). Forgiveness and religious faith in Roman Catholic married couples. Pastoral Psychology. This paper showed a statistical connection between faith and forgiveness, and reported a factor analysis of a measure of forgiveness.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (2006). Concept development of respect and disrespect in American kindergarten and first- and second-grade children. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 114, 67-80. This report compares kindergarten with 1st/2nd grade children, reporting the results of a quasi-experimental study of children’s conceptual understanding.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Kusanagi, E., Chen, S.-J., Wilkey, B., & MacKay, R. (2006). Contexts of childrearing in Japan and the United States: Daily life settings, relationships, and activities. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report (Hokkaido University), 28, 115-124. This report describes a large-scale survey of Japanese and American mothers and fathers, comparing the factor structure of their beliefs about childrearing.

Sugie, S., Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (2006). Respect in Japanese childhood, adolescence, and society. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 114, 39-52. This article showed how the concept of respect is reflected by Japanese children and adolescents, as grounded in Japanese history and culture.

Shwalb, D. W., Takahashi, M., Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. A. (2005). Shinrigakusha no tame no net skill guidebook: Eigo ni yoru Internet communication nyumon [Introduction to Internet communication: A guidebook for psychologists]. Kyoto: Kitaoji Shobo. (in Japanese) This guidebook (in Japanese) introduced readers to the use of the Internet (World Wide Web, e-mail, etc.) for students and scholars of psychology.

Shwalb, D. W., Nakazawa, J., & Shwalb, B. J. (Eds.) (2005). Applied developmental psychology: Theory, practice, and research from Japan. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. This book included sixteen chapters of research reports and literature review by native Japanese developmental psychologists emphasizing applied and cultural issues.

Shwalb, D. W., Sugie, S., & Yang, C. M. (2005). Motivation for abacus studies and school mathematics: A longitudinal study of Japanese 3rd - 6th graders. In D. Shwalb, J. Nakazawa, & B. Shwalb (Eds.), Applied developmental psychology: Theory, practice, and research from Japan (pp. 109-135). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. This chapter used Structural Equation Modeling to test the relations between motivation and self-perceptions of abacus juku studies and formal school math.

Shwalb, D. W., Nakazawa, J., Yamamoto, T., & Hyun, J.-H. (in press). Fathering in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean cultures: A review of the research literature. In M. Lamb (Ed.), The role of the father in child development (4th edition). New York: Wiley. This chapter reviewed research previously only available in the Japanese, Chinese, and Korean languages, which had been unknown to audiences outside of Asia.

Shwalb, D., Bubb, R., Daveline, A., Humperys, C., Evans, K., Erickson, M., Hall, A., Hunter, T., Kilgore, P., Lemon, N., MacKay, R., Mathews, R., Ostenson, J., & Wilkey, B. A. (in press). Coming to America: Asian fathers cross cultures. Marriage and families. This paper reports interviews with immigrant and sojourner fathers from Japan, Korea, China, India, Vietnam and Thailand, on their transition to fathering in the U.S.

Shwalb, D. W., Chen, S. -J., MacKay, R., & Wilkey, B. (2003). "Are children among the gods?": Parental images of children and childrearing in Japan and the United States. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report. This report was about how parents in 2 cultures think about their children and the nature of childhood, and about intervening in children’s disputes with friends.)

Shwalb, D. W. (2000). The overwhelming importance of personal relationships for Japanese human development and motivation. Human Development, 40, 230-234. This invited commentary discussed research on adolescents’ relationships in terms of basic values and motivation among the Japanese.

Shwalb, D. W., & Sukemune, S. (1998). Help seeking in the Japanese college classroom: Developmental, cultural and social-psychological influences. In S. Karabenick (Ed.), Strategic help seeking: Implications for knowledge acquisition (pp. 141-170). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter discussed my experiences teaching in Japanese colleges, focusing on the issue of why college students are hesitant to ask questions in class.

Nakazawa, J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1997). Japanese developmental psychology in the 1990s. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 18, 447-452. This was an introductory article of a special edition of the journal we edited to introduce the work of several scholars who were unknown outside of Japan.

Shwalb, D. W., Kawai, H., Shoji, J., & Tsunetsugu, K. (1997). The middle class Japanese father: A survey of parents of preschoolers. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 18, 497-511. This paper was based on a large-scale survey by a consortium of psychologists, physicians, and clinicians, and sponsored by the Japanese government.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (Eds.) (1996). Japanese childrearing: Two generations of scholarship. New York: Guilford Press. This book included essays and personal retrospectives by eight pioneers in the field of Japanese family studies, and reaction papers by eight younger scholars.

Shwalb, D. W., & Chen, S. -J. (1996). Sacred or selfish? A survey on Japanese parents' images of children. Research and Clinical Center for Child Development Annual Report (Hokkaido University), 18, 33-44. This paper looked at parents’ reaction to the old Japanese saying that "Until age 7 children are among the gods" and found it to be of limited modern relevance.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Shoji, J. (1996). Japanese mothers' ideas about infants and temperament. In S. Harkness & C. Super (Eds.), Parents' cultural belief systems (pp.169-191). New York: Guilford Press. This chapter discussed how mothers in Japan use different categories (dimensions) to understand the temperament of their babies, and how these categories are similar to those used to describe adult personality.

Shwalb, D. W., Kawai, H., Shoji, J., & Tsunetsugu, K. (1995). The place of advice: Japanese parents' sources of information about child health and development. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 16(4), 645-660. This survey showed that Japanese mothers and fathers both lack information about children, and that particularly fathers have very limited social networks.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1995). Cooperative learning and cultural context: An integrative review. International Journal of Educational Research, 23(3), 293-300. This chapter integrated several papers about the influence of history and cultural values on the success of cooperative learning methods in schools.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (Eds.) (1995). Cooperative learning and cultural context. Whole issue, International Journal of Educational Research, 23(3), 191-300. We edited this special issue of the IJER, a collection of invited papers about how cooperative learning is used in Asia, Africa, Europe, and North/South America.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Nakazawa, J. (1995). Competitive and cooperative attitudes: A longitudinal survey of Japanese adolescents. Journal of Early Adolescence, 15(1), 267-290. This three-year survey showed that cooperativeness and competitiveness depends not only on age, but also students’ entry year into school and the specific classrooms to which they belong.

Shwalb, B. J., Shwalb, D. W., & Shoji, J. (1994). Structure and dimensions of maternal perceptions of Japanese infant temperament. Developmental Psychology, 30(2), 131-141. This paper presented our new assessment scale to measure understanding of babies’ temperament, showing the influence of culture on mothers’ perceptions.

Shwalb, D. W. (1993). The internationalization of psychology. Newsletter of the Japanese Psychological Association, 4, 5. This invited essay discussed the importance of Japanese psychology for the internationalization of world psychology.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1992). Development of a course ratings form by college students and faculty. Teaching of Psychology, 19(4), 232-234. This paper tells how an undergraduate psychology class created a new teacher rating questionnaire, which has been used since by the entire college.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Harnisch, D., Maehr, M., & Akabane, K. (1992). Personal investment in Japan and the USA: A study of worker motivation. International Journal of Intercultural Communication, 16,107-124. This study replicated an American survey on worker motivation, and showed important differences in the thinking of American and Japanese workers.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., Sukemune, S., & Tatsumoto, S. (1992). Japanese non- maternal childcare: Past, present and future. In M. Lamb, K. Sternberg, C. -P. Hwang, & A. Broberg (Eds.), Childcare in context (pp.331-353). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter described the history of Japanese alternatives to children being raised at home by mothers, including day care centers, kindergartens, grandparents, and residential institutions.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Murata, K. (1991). Individualistic striving and group dynamics of Japanese fifth and eighth grade boys. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 22(3), 347-361. This report described an experiment on Japanese children, which showed that 5th graders work best in groups while 8th graders prefer to compete and work alone.

Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Murata, K. (1989). Cooperation, competition, individualism and interpersonalism in fifth and eighth grade Japanese boys. International Journal of Psychology, 24, 617-630. This study combined a survey and an experiment and showed that while cooperation is valued both in 5th and 8th grade, competition becomes more desirable and complex with age.

Shwalb, D. W., Imaizumi, N., & Nakazawa, J. (1987). The modern Japanese father: Roles and problems in a changing society. In M. E. Lamb (Ed.), The father's role: Cross-cultural perspectives (pp. 247 - 269). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. This chapter discussed research published in Japan, and showed how the roles of Japanese fathers are poorly defined and rapidly changing.

Shwalb, B. J., Shwalb, D. W., & Azuma, H. (1986). Educational technology in the Japanese schools: A meta-analysis. Educational Technology Research, 9,13-30. This paper described the effectiveness of a limited number of interventions using educational technology in Japan, prior to the advent of desktop computers.

Shwalb, B. J., & Shwalb, D. W. (1985). The development of cooperation and competition in Japanese public schools: Two national surveys. Evaluation in Education, 9, 285-299. This research showed how cooperation and competition change between elementary school and high school, from the views of both teachers and pupils.

Kida, H., Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (Eds.) (1985). Socialization and school achievement in Japan: Implications for educators. Whole issue, Evaluation in Education, 9, 217-300. We edited this special journal issue to present the work of six important researchers who conducted research on Japanese schooling.

Shwalb, D. W., & Shwalb, B. J. (1985). Japanese cooperative and competitive attitudes: Age and gender effects. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 8, 313-328. This paper showed that Japanese boys tend to have more competitive and less cooperative values, compared with girls, from childhood through adolescence.