Withdrawal Support

Do you intend to return to SUU in the future

Do you intend to transfer to another university

  • Please complete this online withdrawal form and set an appointment to meet with our office
  • Be sure to request your transcripts through your SUU Portal

Do you have other plans

  • Please complete this online withdrawal form and set an appointment to meet with our office
  • Good luck with your future plans!

FAQ's

If you wish to keep your scholarship for future semesters, you must complete a scholarship deferment form. Acceptable reasons to defer your scholarship include, but are not limited to: military service, medical reasons, or church service. Once a deferment form is filled out, the request must be approved by the Financial Aid Scholarship committee. You cannot defer a scholarship or receive a leave of absence and attend any other institution of higher learning. It is essential that you meet the scholarship GPA requirement and have passed at least 70% of your attempted credits if you want to defer your scholarship.

This answer depends on WHEN you complete the withdrawal request form.

  • If you withdraw before the 100% refund deadline, you will be refunded 100% of whatever was paid out of pocket, the Financial Aid office will return 100% of your federal aid, and any remaining balance will be removed.
  • If you withdraw after the 100% refund deadline, the Financial Aid office will run a calculation that determines if you will have to owe any money back, depending on the amount of time you have been attending classes. The SUU Financial Aid office will return that amount to the government and you will then owe that amount to SUU.
You should only consider the emergency withdrawal option if you have experienced an emergency/unique circumstance that has prevented you from attending class or performing well in your classes. The majority of students will complete the standard online withdrawal option. The difference between the standard and emergency withdrawal is that the emergency withdrawal allows a student to petition for a refund or change in academic records depending on their circumstances. The standard withdrawal does not.

SUU is not really regulated on how to handle private loans after a student withdraws. It is in your best interest to inform your lender of your withdrawal and discuss further options. It also depends on the timing of your withdrawal:

  • If you withdraw before the 100% refund deadline, the alternative loan amount may be refunded to you. In which case, it's on you to return that amount to the loan lender.
  • If you withdraw after the 100% refund deadline, you will not receive a refund of your alternative student loan that was paid out to SUU. You will have to go into repayments for that loan.
  • When you withdraw before the 100% refund deadline, your transcript will not be affected in any way.
  • When you withdraw after the 100% refund deadline, you will have a “W” on your transcript for each class you withdrew from. “W”s do not affect your GPA.
If you retake the course(s) you withdrew from, that does not negate the “W.” Rather, the newly earned grade will be coupled with the “W.”
  • If you received a refund and withdrew before the 100% refund deadline, you will have to return that amount to SUU.
  • If you received a refund and withdrew after the 100% refund deadline, the Financial Aid office will determine how much of that refund you will have to pay back to SUU and reach out to you via email.
  • If you withdraw before the 100% refund deadline, the loans will be returned to the servicer and you will not need to repay them.
  • If you withdraw after the 100% refund deadline, you will possibly owe a sum to SUU for those loans, as well as going into repayment after 6 months of not being enrolled.
You can complete the Scholarship Appeal process to advocate for your scholarship to be reinstated, based on your extenuating circumstances.
  • Completion rate is calculated by dividing the number of credits passed by the number of credits attempted.
  • This rate is important because students need to maintain a 70% completion rate in order to receive Federal Financial Aid or Institutional Scholarships.