Festival of Excellence

This is an archived program. To view the program for the current year, please go to suu.edu/excellence/program.

2016 Festival of Excellence Awards

The Festival of Excellence recognizes exceptional student presentations through two award programs. The Dean's Honor Roll, selected by college deans, and the Distinguished Presentation Awards, selected by a panel of faculty judges.

Dean's Honor Roll

Students presenting at the Festival of Excellence are eligible to be recognized for the quality of their project by their College Dean. Nomination to the Festival of Excellence Honor Roll signifies the presenter’s expertise in their discipline and personal responsibility. Each presentation recognized received a $150 SUU Bookstore Scholarship.

2016 Dean's Honor Roll Recipients

Beverley Taylor Sorenson College of Education & Human Development

Concussions in Sport

Presentation ID: 089

Presenter: Brittany Goldberg
Mentor: Ricky Mendini
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Research to Enhance our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: ED 202
Time: 1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Session: 4

Abstract:


Concussions, or mild traumatic brain injuries, have become a regular topic in the news in the recent years. The word concussion has become a buzzword that can be thrown around by individuals with little knowledge of what a concussion really is. The lack of education of the general public can be dangerous to the youth of today. Parents and coaches alike should be aware of the seriousness of concussions and what signs and symptoms are present when an athlete has a concussion. This year myself along with the certified athletic trainers at SUU completed baseline concussions with all of the student athletes on campus. My presentation will include a basic knowledge of concussions, what signs and symptoms are most common, and what can be done to help an athlete. More importantly, I will also explain what our athletic training staff has been doing to keep our athletes safe.

Keywords: concussion, sports

College of Humanities & Social Science


Presenter: Eben Thomas
Mentor: Alexandra Perkins
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Community Engagement
Location: ED 215
Time: 9:20 AM - 9:35 AM
Session: 1

Abstract:


In an era in which minorities are fighting for, and receiving, increased civil rights, it is common for every aspect of a minority's experience to be politicized in majority discourse. Rarely are distinct lines drawn between what is actually up for debate and what are the integral aspects of a community. Often, issues become so abstractified from the humanity which they affect that discussions quickly dissolve into harmful and unproductive arguments. Coming from the perspective of a trans individual, and considering the important strides recently made in the fight for LGBT rights, this presentation explores the odd reality that in order for future progress to be achieved a step back from the political, and an emphasis on human connection, is necessary to foster mutual compassion and growth. The presentation explores methods of achieving cooperation and distinguishing the political from the personal, including direct interaction, education, and the power of artistic pieces and performances. It also explains the fallacy and ultimate failure of past approaches along the same vein, particularly those that incorrectly claimed the existence of identical experiences and needs between the majority and minority.

Keywords: civil rights, activism, lgbtq, politics, compassion

Presenter: James Loken
Mentor: Mark Atkinson
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Global Engagement
Location: ED 215
Time: 2:20 PM - 2:35 PM
Session: 5

Abstract:


The purpose of this study was to examine the nature and scope of the relationship between virtual interactions across cultures and an individual's Cultural Intelligence Quotient. This study also identified which media types (synchronous or asynchronous) and functionalities (simple or complex) were preferred by virtual exchange participants. The data from this study suggested that there is a statistically significant positive linear correlation between virtual interaction and Cultural Intelligence. The data also indicated that complex asynchronous exchange types were preferred by program participants.

Keywords: Cross-Cultural Interaction, Educational Technology, Cultural Intelligence, Educational Media Preference and Proclivity, and Virtual Interaction.

Presenter: Corey Morrill
Mentor: Kyle Bishop
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Creative Expression
Location: ED 103
Time: 2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Session: 5

Abstract:


Last year three of my close friends went down the long, painful road of heavy drug addiction when they began using heroin. Despite the way their addiction caused them to act, I did my best to stand by them through their experience. My memoir piece goes into the details of that year and how it affected all of us. It covers everything from when they first began using up until two of them had to drop out of school to go to rehab. It also goes into a brief history of the drug and how it has affected the world since its creation. This was one of my earlier pieces of creative non-fiction. This piece in particular has gone through at least five revisions. I worked very closely with one of the university's non-fiction professors in order to get it to where it is now. Although my own campus may be a bit too conservative to ever have a piece like this published in our literary journal or read to an audience, I believe it to be a strong piece that ultimately demonstrates the way that serious drug addiction affects not only the people who are using drugs, but also the people who care about them. I would be pleased to have the chance to present this to some of my peers.

Keywords: Heroin, illegal substances, relationships, memoir

College of Performing & Visual Arts

Minutes: A Song Cycle

Presentation ID: 171

Presenter: Brandon Grayson
Mentor: Peter Sham
Presentation Type: Performance
Category: Creative Expression
Location: Thorley Recital Hall (MU 202)
Time: 11:20 AM - 11:35 AM
Session: 3
Co-Presenters: Alec Terberg, Keaton Johns, Sara Funk, Christoper Whiteside, Colton Needles, Holly Barrick, Courtney McMullin, Evangeline Stott

Abstract:


Minutes: A Song Cycle is an original song cycle written by SUU student composer & lyricist Brandon Scott Grayson, and was performed in the SUU Black Box January 28 - February 2. With this performance as part of the Festival of Excellence, we are seeking to highlight a completely student created experience, from the writing to the production, to show people what SUU theatre students can and have accomplished. Since we only have 15 minutes, we will perform a medley of songs from the show, leaving time for Q&A and explaining the creative process that went behind it all. We think this would be a great opportunity to show the drive, creativity, and commitment that theatre students here at SUU have to create new and daring works, and to continue to practice and hone their craft in a wonderful environment such as SUU.

Keywords: song cycle, original work, new musical, student created

The Music Major: China vs. US

Presentation ID: 177

Presenter: Wenyu Shu
Mentor: Christian Bohnenstengel
Presentation Type: Performance
Category: Creative Expression
Location: Thorley Recital Hall (MU 202)
Time: 2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Session: 5

Abstract:


Wenyu Shu is a junior pursuing a Music Education degree at Central China Normal University. She has been in the Department of Music at SUU as an exchange student since August of 2015. Her lecture recital compares the music curricula at Southern Utah University and Central China Normal University. Since both institutions require previous musical experience in order to be admitted into their degree programs, the lecture also looks beyond higher education and examines the role of music in public education in each country. An integral part of music degree programs at universities is the preparation and the performance of a recital program. Shu will present some of the piano works she has been preparing for her degree recital and explore the differences in the preparation process between the universities. Dr. Xun Sun, Director of Orchestral Activities, will evaluate the music degree in China from the faculty's perspective and Dr. Christian Bohnenstengel, Director of Keyboard Studies, will supplement the faculty's perspective of the degree program at SUU.

Keywords: Music, Piano, Education, China

School of Business

Globally Engaged

Presentation ID: 204

Presenter: Lauren Colby
Mentor: Tyler Stillman
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Global Engagement
Location: Ballroom - R4, T5, A
Time: 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Session: 1

Abstract:


This project is a summation of my educational experience in marketing, graphic design, and international business. I have studied marketing and graphic design at SUU since 2013. I also spent a year studying international business in Poitiers, France through SUU School of Business' Double-Degree program. Throughout my academic experience, I have worked with a diverse range of professors and students on in-depth case studies for various global brands. My time abroad finished with my engagement to another SUU student who was in the same program. This time was an incredible period of learning, academically, culturally, and personally. I consider this study abroad experience invaluable to my education at SUU and I couldn't keep this opportunity a secret from those who may take advantage of it as well. So, I made the decision to take my experience and come up with a way to celebrate studying abroad. Using my marketing expertise and graphic design experience, I crafted a marketing strategy to promote studying abroad to students. I created a logo and branding system for my campaign as well as prepared materials for five promotional vehicles. The end result is a professionally prepared marketing plan highlighting the benefits of study abroad. My presentation is a display of all the promotional materials I designed and a thorough explanation of my strategic marketing decisions. I welcome discussion about what I learned in my study abroad or in the process undertaken for this marketing and graphic design capstone project. See you there!

Keywords: marketing, graphic design, study abroad, international business, communications

School of Integrative & Engaged Learning

AdventuresRated.com

Presentation ID: 077

Presenter: Brent Foster
Mentor: Shalini Kesar
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Outdoor Engagement and Environmental Stewardship
Location: ED 205
Time: 1:20 PM - 1:35 PM
Session: 4

Abstract:


This is a bachelor of interdisciplinary studies capstone project. My areas of emphasis are aviation, business management, marketing, French and Chinese. This project involves creating a unique website and online platform for adventurers. The goal of this project is to get people outside, to be more active, and to resolve the issue of having to go to multiple websites to plan an outdoor activity. The aim is not profitability, it is a self-sustaining and continually improving website for the enjoyment of its users. The purpose of this project is to design a website that will give people a place to find detailed information about various outdoor activities, running events, hikes, and adventures. Website members will be invited to participate in free local activities planned by professional guides. The website will contain media rich reviews and ratings from professional guides and website members. Instead of the common one-to-ten rating scale or five-star rating scale, a more reliable method of reviewing and rating will be used along with useful statistics. The presentation will conclude by showing the progress of the website and inviting the audience to join me on my next adventure.

Keywords: Adventure, Trips, Outdoors, Activities, Utah

Walter Maxwell Gibson College of Science & Engineering


Presenter: Kaylee Johnson
Mentor: Kim Weaver
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Outdoor Engagement and Environmental Stewardship
Location: ED 205
Time: 11:00 AM - 11:15 AM
Session: 3
Co-Presenters: Macee Black, Trystan Blake, Alex Brown

Abstract:


In August of 2015 the EPA caused a spill of approximately five million gallons of mining water into the Animas Valley River in Durango, Colorado. It then affected the connecting San Juan River and Colorado River. Fish from the San Juan River, in Bluff, UT, and Lake Powell were tested for metals before the spill and in March 2016 after the spring thaw. Metal analysis via ICP-MS was performed on the fish and water to identify significant changes in metal concentrations before and after the spill that are potentially toxic.

Keywords: Mine, Metals, Fish, Spill, Water

Presenter: Jeffry Yon
Mentor: Johnny MacLean
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Outdoor Engagement and Environmental Stewardship
Location: ED 205
Time: 11:40 AM - 11:55 AM
Session: 3
Co-Presenters: Johnny MacLean

Abstract:


The San Juan River is one of the major tributaries to the Colorado River system. The lower San Juan River in southeastern Utah exposes outcrops of the Paradox Formation, which is a major oil producer in the nearby Aneth field. Also, Laramide deformation is beautifully exposed at the Comb Ridge and Raplee Ridge anticlines. This study addresses channel evolution through spatially opulent photography by cross referencing current and past aerial photography, current and archival spatial photography, to show how stream flow has affected the channel width. Using Esri ArcMap 10.2.2, USGS databases, and Google Earth, channel widths have been analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to show that channel narrowing has resulted from manmade factors. The study area comprises one location along the Comb Ridge Anticline directly below Comb Wash. Temporal data for this study begins from the pre-dam era in 1952 and ends with the most recent data from 2015. It has been possible to show changes in channel width by using spatial photographs from 1952, 1998, and 2015, along with aerial and satellite photographs from 1952, 1993, and 2015. Photogrammetry, along with hydrological data, were temporally correlated to substantiate that the dam has affected channel evolution. This in turn, has affected the density of the biodiversity that has also aided in channel narrowing. The channel profile has greatly been affected and altered through the evolving biodiversity, narrowing the channel width on a meter scale.

Keywords: hydrology, geology, San Juan, Colorado River, photogrammetry

Presenter: Phillip Hilton
Mentor: Helen Boswell
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Research to Enhance our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: ED 202
Time: 10:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Session: 2
Co-Presenters: Matthew Vaughn, Helen Boswell, Rita Osborn

Abstract:


The purpose of this study is to identify the (1) levels and sources of stress that pre-health students experience while attending Southern Utah University and (2) mechanisms that these students use to cope with stress. We distributed a survey to students enrolled in their second, third, and fourth years of the Rural Health Scholars Program. This survey was open to students during the third- and second-to-last weeks prior to final exams. Preliminary results from the survey confirm that the majority of pre-health students enrolled in Rural Health Scholars program experience high levels of stress during this time of the semester, primarily due to academic demands but also due to other key factors. Of special concern is our finding that a significant proportion of students cope with stress using behaviors that are potentially damaging. We plan to extend this survey to all students at Southern Utah University in order to cross-analyze stress levels and coping mechanisms among different colleges. We are currently investigating methods of teaching students how to properly cope with stress and ultimately hope to be able to suggest ways to promote education to students on how to cope with stress in healthier ways.

Keywords: stress, healthy habits, pre-health, coping mechanisms, rural health scholars

Presenter: Paige Milar
Mentor: Nica Clark
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Research to Enhance our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: ED 203
Time: 10:20 AM - 10:35 AM
Session: 2

Abstract:


What if you were allergic to all but five foods? Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES) is a non-immunoglobulin E (non-IgE) mediated immune reaction in the gastrointestinal system—essentially a strong allergic reaction to specific foods. FPIES begins early in life, usually after the introduction of milk- or soy-based formulas. Symptoms including severe vomiting and diarrhea can begin 2-4 hours after ingestion of problematic foods, and can cause extensive nutritional deficiencies and health problems. Very few doctors, dietitians, or community members know about the disease or the profound effects it can have on a child's life.

Keywords: Health, Nutrition, Family, Allergies

Distinguished Presentation Awards

These awards are given to mentor-nominated projects judged by a panel of experts. The top 10% presentations from each presentation type were awarded $25 SUU Bookstore Scholarships.

2016 Distinguished Presentation Award Recipients

Oral Presentations

Linux Malware Analysis

Presentation ID: 043

Presenter: Alexander Rodriguez-Vargas
Mentor: Rob Robertson
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Digital and Information Literacy
Location: ED 115
Time: 10:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Session: 2

Abstract:


Malicious software (aka: malware) has been in circulation for over 3 decades and yet, due to its constantly evolving nature, has evaded full eradication and defense. Unfortunately, a silver bullet doesn't yet exist to take down the beasts devised by malicious intenders. Nonetheless I believe progress in this field can be made by catching samples of current malware distributed in the wild and analyzing their inner workings for clues to designing an improved defense against them. This research project set out to discover not only the demystifying facts about digital computer viruses designed to impact the Linux operating system, but also to find the creator's purpose behind the software's distribution.

Keywords: Linux, Malware, Honeypot, Analysis.

Presenter: Jonathan Frehner
Mentor: Joshua Price
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Leadership and Entrepreneurship
Location: ED 102
Time: 11:40 AM - 11:55 AM
Session: 3

Abstract:


Students often overestimate the cost of college, sometimes by 300%. Low-income students may assume that they can't attend college because they do not have the resources necessary to obtain a college degree. Because of their status they don't even apply for college, even though they have the grades and capacity to succeed. Our project looks at the relationship between a student's enrollment at Southern Utah University based on the information they were given about their eligibility for federal aid (Pell Grant). We have asked high schools in the state of Utah to send us lists of seniors that are on free or reduced price lunch and who also have a 3.1 GPA or higher. After we collect the lists of students from the schools, we then send out one of two letters to the students. One letter offers the student automatic admission to SUU, based on them completing the application; this is our control group. The second letter gives the same information, but in addition, states the actual cost of attending SUU based on them receiving federal aid and gives them instructions on how to fill out the FAFSA. Our hypothesis is that the students who receive the real cost of attending SUU and information about FAFSA will more likely apply and enroll in the university. This project aims at bridging the gap between low-income students and universities, giving them the chance to earn a college degree.

Keywords: Behavioral economics, Admissions, Enrollment, Southern Utah University

Presenter: Chesley Gale
Mentor: Johnny MacLean
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Outdoor Engagement and Environmental Stewardship
Location: ED 205
Time: 1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Session: 4
Co-Presenters: Brennan Brunsvik, Mackenzie Cope

Abstract:


The Indian Peak-Caliente Caldera Complex (IPCCC) is a region of ancient supervolcano activity located in eastern Nevada. This region has an extensive history of massive volcanic eruptions over millions of years. During this time period, many volcanic structures formed and sequentially collapsed. The IPCCC is an ideal site to study how large-scale tectonic forces can influence mineralogy on a local scale. This research was completed and compiled by the Tectonics and Mineralogy classes at Southern Utah University during a joint class field study and subsequent laboratory analyses. During the field trip, the main focuses were to observe collapsed volcano relationships and volcanic debris deposits and to collect samples at Condor Canyon and English Canyon, two sites near the border between Nevada and Utah within the IPCCC. After the field trip, the Tectonics class completed a detailed literature review of the overall tectonic evolution of the region while the Mineralogy students analyzed the collected samples. We will discuss the results, including mineralogical descriptions; an interpretation of a piece-meal, or piston-like, collapse of the volcano complex within the IPCCC; and a connection between the local geology and the regional tectonic setting.

Keywords: Geology, Volcano, Caldera, Petrography

Presenter: Aferdit Sadrija
Mentor: Lynn White
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Research to Enhance our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: ED 203
Time: 10:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Session: 2

Abstract:


Cephalic phase responses (CPRs) are anticipatory strategies that allow organisms to efficiently regulate homeostatic disturbances caused by food intake. Among many other digestive- and metabolic-related substances, blood glucose (BG) has been identified as a CPR through modified sham feeding (MSF) techniques. The purpose of this study is to examine BG CPRs to the sight alone, smell alone, and combined sight and smell [sham feeding (SF)] of foods high and low on the glycemic index (GI). Seventy undergraduate students are being recruited to participate. They will be randomly assigned to one of seven testing conditions in which the modality of sensory stimuli of food, and the GI of food will vary. BG level will be measured prior to presentation of stimuli, and four times post-presentation. The principle hypotheses maintain that, 1) for high GI food, smell and SF will yield a larger difference in BG measures from baseline than will visual stimuli of food. 2) For low GI foods, the sight, smell, and SF stimuli will have a negligible impact on BG levels compared to baseline. These effects will be tested using two Chi Square Tests of Independence, a Two-Way Independent ANCOVA, and two Two-Way Independent ANOVAs.

Keywords: blood glucose, cephalic responses, glycemic index, classical conditioning

Presenter: Rebecca Maedgen
Mentor: Nathan Werner
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Research to Enhance our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: ED 203
Time: 10:40 AM - 10:55 AM
Session: 2
Co-Presenters: Nathan Werner

Abstract:


Menthol is a natural product isolated from mint leaves and is the active ingredient found in cough drops. It is a six-membered carbon ring that contains three substituents: an alcohol, isopropyl, and methyl group. Six-membered rings exist primarily as an equilibrium mixture of two chair conformations that minimize angle and torsional strain. These conformations for menthol are not degenerate and thus can affect the reactivity of the functional groups contained on the ring. The focus of this research project is the evaluation of the stereochemical selectivity that results from a nucleophilic, and stereochemically labile carbon-magnesium bond contained on a menthol-derived six-membered ring. The potential applications of this research could be in the production of chiral menthol-derived catalysts for the production of new enantioenriched medicines.

Keywords: organic chemistry synthesis reaction discovery

Presenter: Kyle Harvey
Mentor: Kim Craft
Presentation Type: Oral
Category: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Location: BU 102
Time: 9:40 AM - 9:55 AM
Session: 1

Abstract:


The catch phrase "if you want something done, give it to a busy person" is something that the vast majority of individuals are familiar with. The basic idea behind this motto is that "busy people", or rather those with a full plate of activities, are generally considered to be organized, scheduled, and effective in their work. Thus, if the something needs "getting done", these efficient workers are the go-to individuals to seek out. But how does this idea relate to school and grades? Could it be that those students that are most anxiously engaged in employment are actually the same ones that are maintaining the best GPA's? Unfortunately, most of society has crafted some opinion on the matter, but lack any form of formal data or analysis. The ultimate goal of this research and analysis is to establish the link, and measure the effect that employment has on SUU students' academic performance, or rather Grade Point Average (GPA).

Keywords: employment GPA analysis

Presenter: Jandi Hansen
Mentor: Junice Acosta
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Community Engagement
Location: Ballroom - R1, T1, A
Time: 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Session: 1

Abstract:


Both society and culture have a profound influence on the way people speak, from the words they choose to how they pronounce them. In countries such as Spain, there exist specific ways of speaking that effect not only the way native Spaniards speak, but the perceptions outsiders have of them as well. These views may lead to the construction of certain stereotypes associated with these people. The purpose of this study is to explore the connection between stereotypes linked to Spanish society and the phonetic realization of the /z/ and /s/ in young bilingual Americans who learned Spanish in Spain. The data for this study comes from interviews with four individuals: two males and two females who have returned within the past two years from living in Spain. A preliminary data analysis shows a correlation between stereotypes towards the Spain variety of Spanish, or Castellano, and the use of the Spanish theta and the aspirated or eliminated /s/. The expected outcome is to understand how certain societal stereotypes influence the phonetic realization of both the /z/ and /s/ used by these youth, and the circumstances in which they may change.

Keywords: Spanish, stereotypes, phonetics

Poster Presentations

Typical Behaviors and Performance

Presentation ID: 219

Presenter: Daniel Blair
Mentor: Grant Corser
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Innovation in Specialized Disciplines
Location: Ballroom - R1, T3, B
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Session: 2
Co-Presenters: Grant Corser

Abstract:


Do Introverts perform better on projects in isolation; do extraverts excel on an assignment when working on a team, or is the reverse true for one or both? The main purpose of this study is to better understand how personality effects different dynamics faced in education and work settings. With a more extensive knowledge on personality and the workplace, Industrial-Organizational psychologists will be better equipped to structure a more effective and efficient model for the ever-changing world of business. As the #1 growing career for the next ten years, Industrial-Organizational Psychology is needed even more today with such a myriad of difficulties faced by companies in the dynamic world of business.

Keywords: Psychology, Industrial-Organizational, research, Independent, business

Presenter: Aubriel Koehler
Mentor: Chris Monson
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Innovation in Specialized Disciplines
Location: Ballroom - R1, T9, B
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Session: 2
Co-Presenters: Lohra Miller

Abstract:


Many bodies of water have low oxygen concentrations. These areas of water are referred to as anoxic environments. Determining these low levels of oxygen can play an important role in environmental chemistry and pose a unique challenge in analytical chemistry. Currently, the use of the STOX electrode is the only method that is available to test these areas of water to the needed precision. The STOX electrode uses gold electrodes to measure the oxygen that diffuses across two glass membranes with a resting period to get a baseline oxygen concentration. This baseline can then be compared to the signal and used to determine the oxygen concentration. This method is both expensive and very fragile with a short lifetime. Our research is focused on building a microfluidic that will address the issue of cost and durability of the device as well as removing the need for diffusion by advancing solution mixing using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transport, which adds continuous flow into the microfluidic channel for better circulation. Overall, our device should produce a greater response and sensitivity providing a lower limit of detection for oxygen in aqueous solutions.

Keywords: Microfluidics, Anoxic Environments, Oxygen

Presenter: Allison Hadley
Mentor: Christopher Monson
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Innovation in Specialized Disciplines
Location: Ballroom - R2, T2, B
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Session: 2
Co-Presenters: Mandy Nelson

Abstract:


We are developing a microfluidic device that will take a small sample of material, separate DNA, proteins, vitamins, and metabolites from each other and analyze the separated compounds. DNA, protein, and small molecule identification and quantitation are important in many disciplines including biochemistry, biology, medicine, and forensics. Current DNA and small molecule analysis requires the use of lab equipment found in specialized genetic laboratories. This equipment is expensive, difficult to operate, relatively slow, and only operable in sterile lab environments. If successful, our device would be able to separate and potentially analyze the proteomic, genomic, and metabolomics characteristics of a sample quickly and cheaply outside of the lab. The device is made by creating a channel in layers of PDMS, lined with electrodes to create a magnetic field, in which a sample containing charged molecules can be separated through electrophoresis. A microfluidic device is well suited for this type of analysis due the low cost associated with making one and the ability of the device to be modified to the user's needs. Our device could have significant impact on many fields depending on the detection and quantitation of biological molecules.

Keywords: Chemistry, DNA, Microfluidic Devices, Forensics

Presenter: Coral Gardner
Mentor: Fredric Govedich
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship
Location: Ballroom - R3, T8, B
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Session: 2

Abstract:


Sea spiders (pycnogonids) are a small group of exclusively marine arthropods which resemble terrestrial spiders. One family, the Colossendeidae can grow to a very large adult size, much larger than any other pycnogonid. Colossendeis colossea, the largest known species, has a leg span of up to 70 cm and is found in both very deep ocean waters and shallower water in the Antarctic. Since it has been very difficult to obtain and study live specimens of this species, very little is known of their biology and natural history. We have obtained a number of preserved specimens, all labeled C. colossea, from the United States National Museum and are asking the question, are all of these specimens actually C. colossea? To answer this question, the specimens are being compared to syntypes from the Museum of Comparative Zoology and also to the original type description (Wilson, 1881). Based on previous scientific papers on C. colossea and closely related species, the following are used to separate species within this genus: relative proportions of terminal segments of walking leg and of pedipalp; location and number of eyes and shape of eye tubercle; proboscis shape and orientation; number of spine rows on terminal segments of oviger and shape of oviger terminal claw; abdomen size and orientation. Based on these, our preliminary results demonstrate that some of the United States National Museum specimens are not C. colossea since they differ from the syntypes and type description in several of the above characteristics.

Keywords: sea spiders, benthic, Antarctic, marine, arthropod

Social Media and Perfectionism

Presentation ID: 240

Presenter: Stephanie Crank
Mentor: Grant Corser
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Research to Increase our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: Ballroom - R4, T4, B
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Session: 2

Abstract:


Social media is becoming an everyday aspect of many individuals' lives. Several researchers have been curious about the effect of virtual interactions on human behavior and health. A survey of southwestern college undergraduates (n=95) demonstrated a correlation between time spent on social media and some measures of personality, particularly perfectionism.

Keywords: social media, perfectionism, correlation

Presenter: Camille Wheatley
Mentor: Grant Corser
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Research to Increase our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: Ballroom - R4, T5, B
Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Session: 2

Abstract:


Does the name associated with a work of art effect the way it is evaluated and appraised by individuals with no training in art critique? The current study investigated priming and framing properties of contextual evidence and their effect on the perceived value of a work of art. Additionally, this research investigated the influence of personality on framing and priming effects. The purpose of this study was to assess how much influence, if any, the name of an artist has over the perceived value of a work of art and how individual traits influence participant responses. Participants in the study were asked to report on the perceived value of a work of art. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a blind condition (no artist name), an informed condition (art congruent with the known artist's name) and a misinformed condition (art incongruent with a known artist's name). All three conditions conditioned questions intended to assess the overall aesthetic quality, economic value, and perceived value of three lesser-known pieces created by Vincent Van Gogh (Autumn Landscape, 1885), Pablo Picasso (The Roaster, 1938), and Caravaggio (Penitent Mary Magdalene, 1597), as well as one painting completed by an unknown artist, Paige Wheatley (Untitled, 2010). The three personality inventories that were used to assess individual differences included the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR), a shortened version of the Dark Triad, and the HEXACO-60.

Keywords: Framing, Perception, Subjective Mediums, Personality

Presenter: Hailee Holt
Mentor: Nathan Werner
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Innovation in Specialized Disciplines
Location: Ballroom - R2, T1, C
Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Session: 3
Co-Presenters: Nathan Werner

Abstract:


Can a thermodynamically more stable molecule be converted into a less stable isomer under the right conditions? Trans-Alkenes are generally thought of as more stable than cis-alkenes because of the steric repulsion of the groups on a cis double bond. We present our discovery of an organic reaction that is the equivalent of making a chemical waterfall flow uphill.

Keywords: organic chemistry synthesis reaction discovery

Presenter: Taylor Sorenson
Mentor: Nathan Werner
Presentation Type: Poster
Category: Research to Increase our Physical and/or Mental Well-being
Location: Ballroom - R2, T8, C
Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Session: 3
Co-Presenters: Nathan Werner

Abstract:


Chalcones are alpha-beta unsaturated ketones that are found in many critical biological compounds today. Because Chalcones possess two sites of electrophilicity it is possible to observe addition reactions at the carbonyl carbon (1,2-addition) or at the distal carbon (1,4-addition) of the alkene. The concept of the 1,2 (kinetic) vs. 1,4 (thermodynamic) product distribution is studied in sophomore organic chemistry. However, a review of the literature provided very little actual data on the addition of Grignard reagents to Chalcones. We are interested in studying the selectivity (1,2 vs. 1,4) of Grignard addition reagents to Chalcones.

Keywords: organic chemistry synthesis reaction discovery