Southern Utah Museum of Art

A World Transformed: The Transcontinental Railroad and Utah

A World Transformed: The Transcontinental Railroad and Utah

October 14 — December 28

This traveling exhibition shares the story of Utah’s contribution to the completion of the transcontinental railroad and examines the railway’s transformational effects on Utah. A partnership between Utah State University Merrill-Cazier Library and the Utah State Division of History, A World Transformed will travel the state of Utah from January 2019 through March 2020. The exhibition draws upon the many rich historical resources held by different institutions across not only Utah but the Western United States, including photographs, maps, artifacts, and lithographs.

 


Compendium

Compendium

October 14 — December 28

Todd Stewart and Robert Bailey initiated Fieldworks in 2015 as a mobile residency for artists, scholars, and students interested in thinking about how people relate to nature. Traversing arid regions of the western United States, they visit sites where people have marked the land in any number of ways, study these places as traces of people’s varied modes of artistry, and accrue an archive of objects, images, texts, sound, and more that testifies to both the banality and the strangeness of all that people do to transform the environments that they inhabit. As its title implies, Compendium is a collection or anthology of Fieldworks’ manifold practice as an artistic, scholarly, and pedagogical initiative. Both the exhibition itself and an accompanying publication draw from the Fieldworks archive to bring together selections of items that invite viewers and readers to deepen their understanding of the always complex, often troubling, and at times surprising ways that people find their place within the rest of nature.

This project is funded in part by the Kirkpatrick Foundation of Oklahoma City and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies of Brigham Young University.

 

Charles Webb Logo   Kirkpatrick Foundation LogoSUU Aviation Logo


Leviathan: Elegy for Ice

Leviathan: Elegy for Ice

October 14 - April 24, 2020

Originally from Reno, Nevada, artist Pete Froslie currently lives and works in Oklahoma, where his studio practice explores intersections of art, technology, and culture. His work exhibits nationally and internationally, with recent exhibitions in Beijing, Vienna, and Los Angeles, and has appeared in The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and Gizmodo, among other outlets. Froslie received his MFA from the Studio for Interrelated Media at MassArt. He is an associate professor in the School of Visual Arts at the University of Oklahoma.

In Leviathan: Elegy for Ice, Froslie engages themes of climate change, moral and political philosophy, philosophical aesthetics and demonology. He has long been fascinated with the relationship between global politics and economic structures, as well as emerging issues of climate and environmental change, which he understands through the lens of the “Leviathan.” Froslie’s interest is grounded in both the Biblical Leviathan, the sea monster, and Thomas Hobbes’ book about social contract theory, Leviathan, from 1651.

Elegy for Ice offers visitors to SUMA the unique opportunity to watch a working artist’s project unfold, transforming the museum's newest exhibit space into an experimental extension of his studio. Through this process, Froslie will draw on his recent experience traveling along the Svalbard archipelago of Norway aboard an ice class tall ship called the Antigua. During this time, he collected 3D scans and photo-documentation of this environmentally vulnerable territory and obtained underwater recordings of Svalbard fjords.

Using tech media, such as electro-mechanical and game engine-based procedures, he integrates observations from his travels with his academic research. Froslie imagines that this continuous practice of traveling, researching, and making can summon a contemporary “Leviathan,” allowing the intersections between nature, society, and capital to be seen and felt.

Leviathan is not a single, static work, but rather a series that Froslie is building upon for several museum and gallery installations. The on-going project will unfold as a series of iterations developed over the course of Froslie’s tenure at Southern Utah Museum of Art through April 2020. Visit the museum again beginning in late-January to see how the work will evolve and grow through a second iteration.


A Very Big Tiny Art Show at Southern Utah Museum of |Miniature| Art

September 27 - October 19

A Very Big Tiny Art ShowA Very Big Tiny Art Show is a two-week long pop-up exhibition put on by SUMA and Tiny Art Show, based in Provo, UT. The show will feature 26 artists from across Utah, showcasing various styles and media including painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, letterpress, and more. All artwork featured in the show is 3-by-3 inches or smaller, encouraging visitors to immerse themselves in a more intimate exploration of art.

The opening reception will be held from 5-8 p.m. on Friday, September 27 where visitors will have the opportunity to meet some of the artists, enjoy miniature refreshments from The Sugar Cookie, and create their own miniature art. This event is part of SUMA After Hours in conjunction with the Cedar City Arts Council Final Friday Art Walk and SUU Homecoming.

A Very Big Tiny Art Show will be on display beginning at 5 p.m. on September 27 and will run through October 12 in the vestibule area of the museum. While SUMA's main gallery space will be closed from October 6-12, visitors will still be able to visit the museum to view the tiny exhibition.

Featured artists for the exhibition are: Kara Aina, Brooke Bowen, Gina Dodge, Rachel Erickson, Rachel Godfrey, Audrey Hancock, Jeff Hanson, Nicholas Hemingway, Kimberly Ipson, Mary Jabens, Emily E. Jones, Hannah Mason, Carol Ogden, Nancy Olson, Valerie Orelmann, Rachel Pixton, Debbie Robb, Mallory Sanders, Meghan Sours, Whitney Staheli, Sarah Stoddard, Melissa Walkenhorst, Diane Walsh, Jessica Whittaker, Rebecca Wood, and Mona Woolsey.