Health and Wellness Resources for your SUU Student

College can be an overwhelming time for most students as they adjust to new experiences, unfamiliar environments, and establish their independence. Students who have a family history or have previously struggled with their physical or mental health can find it particularly challenging.

If your student is struggling with their physical or mental health, there are a number of campus resources that may be able to help. If your student isn’t sure where to start, have them stop by the Health and Wellness Office in the Sharwan Smith Student Center (ST 175) or reach out to their ACE in The Nest (ST 178) for help in getting connected with trusted campus resources.

  • The Health and Wellness Office offers health education, peer mentoring, and health resources for students, as well as support for students who struggle with alcohol or drug use. The office has a health care kiosk where students can video conference with a doctor, or they can help connect students with off-campus health care resources. Students can drop-in anytime in the Sharwan Smith Student Center (ST 175).
  • Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) offers short-term individual, group, and couples counseling, crisis intervention, outreach and consultation, and online support resources.
  • Disability Resource Center helps determine eligibility for academic accommodations or aids for students with medical, psychological, learning or other disabilities. Located in the Sharwan Smith Student Center (ST 206).
  • SUU Care and Support Team (CAST) includes trained faculty and staff members committed to creating a supportive and welcoming environment at SUU that supports students struggling with emotional distress and mental health.
  • The Title IX office, located in the Bennion Building (BB 111), offers support to victims of gender inequity, sexual discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual abuse, and sexual assault.

If you suspect your student may struggle with their physical or mental help, help them set up extra support in advance.  Students can benefit from continued care with familiar doctors and therapists, or help setting appointments with local providers before symptoms worsen.  Families can also help by setting a regular time to check-in with their student about health related issues, giving students practice filling their own prescriptions and scheduling their own appointments before they come to school, and discussing what to do if they miss a dose of medication and who the student should call if they aren’t feeling well.


Families can also help by setting a regular time to check-in with their students about health related issues, giving students practice filling their own prescriptions and scheduling their own appointments before they come to school, and discussing what to do if they miss a dose of medication. If you have health insurance, see that your student has a copy of the insurance card, and decide ahead of time who the student should call if they are sick or aren’t feeling well. A little advance preparation can help reduce stress for families and their students.

Takeaway:

  • Help your student understand that health and wellness are important to academic success.
  • Remind your student that reaching out for help when needed is crucial to their success.
  • If you suspect your student may struggle with their physical or mental health,  set up support to help them be successful from the start of their college experience.

Takeaway:

  • Help your student understand that health and wellness are important to academic success.
  • Remind your student that reaching out for help when needed is crucial to their success.
  • If you suspect your student may struggle with their physical or mental health, set up support to help them be successful from the start of their college experience.

Next: Academic Expectations for your Student